How to start a pilot car business. Become a pilot car driver.

How to start a pilot car business. We’re here to help.

Over the last few decades, we’ve had hundreds of people contact us and inquire how to start a pilot car business of their own and become a pilot car driver. After attempting to deal with all of these inquiries we felt the best thing to do was create a standardized instruction guide or road map that tells it just how it is. Especially when we have a shortage of pilot car companies in so many geographic locations in North America – we need to bring in thousands of new companies. 

Our perspective was changed a few years ago when someone shared a youtube video link with us that depicted a guy stating he could earn an extra $500 a day using his vehicle as a pilot car. He went on to explain how he preferred to be at home more often (but enjoy the opportunity to travel), enjoy an occasional whiskey drink with a cigar, and eating steak. I think you can search for it and purchase their armchair, whiskey steaks recipe for about $350. He seemed a little vague about things like regulations, certification, insurance, safety equipment, a business license but perhaps that’s all covered in the “package” offered.

It became immediately clear we needed to get involved with helping others obtain affordable pilot car business start-up knowledge. The entire industry as a whole is affected by this shortage.  Clearly, we needed to become more proactive by stepping up and writing a realistic, affordable plan for those interested in starting a profitable and properly functioning pilot car company. Not only teach folks the basic ropes but offer it for a fair price which is difficult. Most of the information is considered proprietary in a very niche industry that has provided our families incomes for our entire lifetimes. However, with the pilot car shortage, we have in North America someone is going to have to inspire and direct others.

After operating for over 18 years online we’ve taken it upon ourselves to do what we do best. Help people. So, we designed a detailed and inclusive package that will steer folks interested in starting their own pilot car business in the proper direction. While we do have to charge for our time we feel the price is very affordable considering what we’re providing you with inside information on exactly how the industry works and what you will be required to have and expect to get your pilot car company in business and rolling down the road. Plus to help offset the start-up costs we give you a free premium year in our PiloTrac directory (valued at $70).

Start a pilot car company.

We’re here to help you get your new pilot car company rolling. Our business insider guide on how to successfully start and maintain your own pilot car company will give you precisely what you need to get your new company going and on the road.

 

 

For $100.00 we give you the real information you need to get your company up and running successfully. Clearly, our industry has a shortage of pilot car company business owners and operators. We need for you to succeed.

Below are just a few highlights of the direction we try to point you in.

Pretty much every state is going to want you to register your business with a minimum of a DBA or “doing business as”. You may decide you would rather start a corporation (Inc.) or a limited liability company (LLC.) once you get going but a DBA may be the right choice for you depending on the laws in your state. We suggest you speak with a licensed attorney about what entity is best for your business as each person’s circumstances are different. There are many factors to consider like taxes, marital status, joint incomes, the amount of money you bring into your household, and of course liability. With a DBA you can get your pants sued off of you in the unfortunate event you made a decision that resulted in property damages or worse caused bodily injury to someone. Have you ever heard someone say: “you can sue my company but please don’t sue me”? Well, if your corporation or LLC is properly set up and you are working for it then it would more than likely be the corporate body bearing the responsibility resulting from your actions. But again – consult a professional attorney in your state. Once you’ve determined your best option you can move on to things like considering obtaining your flaggers license and dealing with any state insurance and training qualifications that may be required. What we teach in our “How to start a pilot car company” kit is to explain all of the ins and outs that are necessary to get your idea off of the ground and get you into our industry. There is ALWAYS a shortage of good, professional pilot car companies.

We teach you the ins/outs of starting and operating your own pilot car company.

  • How to figure out what type of business model is best for you to start your pilot car company.
  • Insurance requirements for pilot car companies and issues to consider.
  • Choosing a vehicle that meets the minimum requirements in order to operate legally in the capacity of a pilot car vehicle.
  • States/Provinces that require pilot car vehicle operators to have certifications and where to get them.
  • What NASTO, SASHTO, MAASTO and WASHTO is and what regions they cover.
  • Required equipment (as suggested by the FMCSA) and minimum requirements.
  • How to get set up for the height-pole pilot car industry.
  • How to get customers so your pilot car company can start making money.
  • Tips on how to operate a pilot car in a professional manner to protect motorists.
  • Invoice template examples and creating them. So your new pilot car company can get paid quickly.
  • What is expected of pilot car vehicle operators? From the driver and pre-trip safety checks and planning.
  • How to create your own “package” to exchange with trucking companies. What you need and what you need from them.
  • Industry rates and what to charge for your pilot car service based on geographic location.
  • Online strategies on how to get your name out there and develop a serious online presence affordably if not free.
  • Basics of how to perform a route survey (done correctly).

Learn how to properly turn your idea into a real company that is up and running. Our simple guide teaches you how to take the path of least resistance. Avoid the pitfalls of “learning as you go” and save time, hassle, money. Run legal, safe, and confident.

Learn exactly what a pilot car company needs in order to safely operate.

There are laws and legalities that govern exactly what needs to be on board a vehicle that is operating in the capacity of a pilot car company. We bring you completely up to speed on exactly what is required in 2020 from professionals that have over 100 years of experience combined. Again, it’s pretty easy to get into our industry and make very good money locally and long haul but earning $500 a week easy, and starting tomorrow, legally and properly it’s simply not going to happen. However, you can get your foot in the door affordably by following our small course and you can also make a lot more than 500 bucks a week – top runners make that in a day. This is NOT AN UP-SALE.

To own a successful pilot car company you need to know where to get customers.

In order to properly start any company, you need to know where to go in order to get work. In our training kit (How to start a pilot car company) we show you exactly where to go and how to go about getting customers. Not only that but we also show you how to set yourself up where it counts the most so you actually have an online presence and are in the mix with oversize trucking companies. After all, that’s the business industry we service: oversize, heavy-haul, and pilot car companies. Not only that but our industry needs more new dependable and reliable pilot car companies so the more we can bring on the better! Think long and hard when considering purchasing our pilot car company business starter kit before trying to just go on your own with web searches and word of mouth. We cut straight to the chase and show you exactly what you will need and where to get it.

Loadboard example.
Our loadboard is full of direct customers looking for quotes from our oversize and heavy haul trucking companies and we know exactly how to connect pilot car companies with carriers.

Work smarter not harder –  “How to start a pilot car company”.

Get our start-up package for over 50% off during 2021 only. We strongly support our industry and need you to succeed so we can ship more goods.

No PayPal account is required. Simply look for the option during the first part of checkout.

Please note: this is a digital download. We manually process orders Monday – Friday 9-4 PST. We check for orders multiple times daily and process any as quickly as possible so you can get started. Check your email inbox a few hours after ordering or possibly the following business day for your attached purchase.

Welcome aboard,

WideloadShipping.com

 

 

Illinois State Shipping Regulations for oversize and heavy haul.

2021 Shipping laws and regulations for shipping oversize and over-weight loads in the state of Illinois.

Illinois

The great state of Illinois official seal.

Please share your expertise or knowledge of Illinois state shipping regulations with other visitors below.

Locate specialized trucking companies in Illinois.
Locate pilot car companies in Illinois.
Order oversize trucking permits.



Legal load limits in Illinois.
Illinois DOT legal load size & weight limitations.

Legal Loads.
Length:  65’ overall length maximum.
Width: 8’6” on the interstate and other designated highways, 8’ on non-designated highways.
Weight:  GVW 80,000,  Single 20,000, Tandem 34,000,   Tridem 42,000
Height:  13’6” is the maximum allowed height for legal loads.
Overhang:  3’ front in the front and 3’ off of the rear of the trailer.

Routine oversize shipping, trucking and transport permits.
Oversize and overweight trucking permits that are routinely issued by the state of Illinois.

Length:  Up to 145’ long. Anything longer refer to the superload section below.
Weight:  Single 24,000, tandem: 48,000, tridum: 60,000, Quadem: 60,00 gross, 5 Axles 100,000 lbs., 6 Axles 120,000 lbs., 7 axels: 120,000, 8 axles: 120,000 lbs.
Width: 14’6” (any load over 16′ will require special admin approval before a permit is issued).
Height: 15’ (any load over 16′ tall requires a route survey).

Superload information:
Illinois DOT superload information.

Length: Any load that is longer than 145′ is considered a superload.
Width: Any load that is in excess of 14′ 6″ in width is considered a superload.
Height: Any load that is in excess of 15′ 6″ in height is considered a superload.
Weight: Any load that exceeds 120,000 lbs on any standard axle configuration whether it’s a 6,7 or 8 axle configuration or not is considered a superload.
Overhang: Contact them as this varies depending on the route.
Notes: Spacing between steer and first tandem must be more than 8′ 1″. The spacing before the first axle and the trailer must not exceed 18′ 6″.  All axle spacings combined must not be less than 43′ 6″. Superload permit processing times vary. Expect delays. Before requesting a route you are expected to do as much research on your own as possible. They will refer you to GettingAroundIllinois for construction zones and other closures. 

Permitted travel times and restrictions in Illinois:
Illinois travel times and restrictions for oversize loads.

Travel is permitted from ½ hour before sunrise to ½ hour after sunset  Monday thru Friday and ½ hour before sunrise until 12PM on Saturdays. Loads that are overweight only may travel 24/7 on all days of the week (make certain it is not documented otherwise on your permit before doing so). No travel is permitted on Sundays unless you are below the routine permit standards of no more than 115′ in length, 12′ in width, 13′ 6″ in height (sunrise to sunset rules apply).  No movement is permitted on the major holidays: New Years Day, Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Thanksgiving Day, and Christmas Day. Travel stops at 12PM on the day before any of these holidays. The Illinois oversize load permit office is closed on MLK Day, Lincoln’s birthday, Washington’s birthday, Columbus Day, Election Day, Veterans Day, and on the day after Thanksgiving. However, travel is not restricted on these days. Always refer to your permit for approved travel times.

Required shipment, truck and trailer markings:
Truck, trailer, and shipment required signs, banners, and flags.

A rotating amber light must remain on at all times mounted on top of the cab and be visible from 360 degrees from a minimum of 500′ in direct sunlight. If your overall length is more than 80′ in length you are required to have one amber light over the cab of the truck and one amber light no more than 10′ from the rear of end or trailer/load at the highest point that is practical. Oversize load signs must be a minimum of 7′ in width x 18″ in height, have a yellow background color with black lettering no less than 10″ in height x 1″ thick – we have recently heard 12″ tall x 2″ thick so please clarify and comment below if you know which is correct. Flags are required at all 4 corners of the load and front of the truck and are to be safety red in color and no less than 18″ square. Shipments over 75′ in length, 10′ in width, or 14′ 6″ in height are required to have signs. Signs must be placed on the front and rear extremities of the truck, trailer, or load.

When pilot cars are required:

Length: If over 110′ in length you are required to have a minimum of 1 pilot car and in some places 2 pilot cars (higher traffic density or certain times of year). If over 145′ (150′ in some very rural areas) in length you are required to have 3 pilot cars –  yes 3. If over 175′ in length a police escort will be required.
Width: Up to 14’6” requires 1 pilot/escort vehicle. Over 16’ requires 2 pilot/escort vehicles. Over 18′ in width will require a police escort. 
Height: Up to 14’ 6” 1 pilot/escort vehicle, over 16’ requires 2 pilot/escort vehicles. Over 18′ in height will require a police escort.
Weight: No requirements as long as you can maintain minimum speeds. However, on bridge moves that require all other vehicle traffic to be removed will require an appropriate number of pilot cars which is a minimum of 2 and possibly 3 with police escort. All areas are different and require evaluation.
Note: If you exceed any two dimensions, then you are required to have an additional pilot car. So if you’re over 14′ 6″ tall and 14′ 6″ wide you would be required to have 2 pilot cars.  

Required pilot car certifications:

Cars, vans, or trucks may be used as long as the gross weight of the pilot car vehicle is rated at no more than 8,000 lbs. Pilot car driver must be 18 years of age minimum with a valid regular driver’s license. Pilot cars must have a rotating or flashing amber light mounted on the top of the vehicle. Must display a red flag at all 4 outermost points of the vehicle and have “OVERSIZE LOAD” signs that are a minimum size of 5′ wide x 12″ tall and have black lettering no less than 8″ in height. Must have radio and be in constant communication with the driver transporting the shipment at all times. Must have $500,000 per occurrence combined insurance that covers property and body.

How to apply for trucking permits:

Illinois Department of Transportation – DOT
Bureau of Traffic, 2300 S Dirksen Parkway
Springfield, IL  62764

Email: dot.permitoffice “at” illinois.gov
General inquiry phone: 217-782-6273
Phone: 217-785-1477 or 800-252-8636 within the state.
Fax: 217-728-3572

Note: Fee varies depending on dimensions and miles traveled. A permit is valid for 5 days.

Hours: from 8 AM until 4:30 PM

Central Time Zone

 

The information contained in these pages is research information primarily for use by oversize and overweight trucking company drivers, dispatchers, and pilot car companies. While every effort is put into maintaining the accuracy of this information you must absolutely verify this information with the Illinois State DOT Permits office before commencing movement.

illinois-state

Preparation for eating healthy on the road.

Preparation for eating healthy on the road.

Part 2.

Preparing for healthy eating on the road.

It’s Mr. Miles here sending out warm wishes and safe travels again!

The last time we chat (see; part 1.) we talked about eating healthy foods and what that can do to your overall well being – both mental and physical. It’s important to always have an idea of what you’re putting in your body and what that can mean. No one wants to feel sluggish and lack energy when getting a  load down the byways and highways. Let’s talk about preparing for healthy eating on the road as it will take some effort but with a little bit of effort can become routine. Now that you’re aware of some of the health implications of “quick food” there are almost endless and countless healthy options and alternatives to consume when you’re away from home. So, let’s slip this rig into overdrive and start breaking down how you can cook up tasty treats and chow down in no time!!!

Storing food and preparing meals is a lot easier than it sounds when you’re away from home. Since your ride is essentially your home for long stretches of time, you have to treat it that way.  Of course a mini-fridge is a big bonus but if you don’t have one, get a good camper cooler that runs on 12 volts – there super efficient which means easy on your battery and alternator. Plus, it’ll pay for itself quicker than you may think if you’re not seeking ice every day. Even without a fridge, you can still whip up some mean dishes that pack plenty of punch. Where the real fun starts in “Flavor Town” is with creativity and low energy consumption. Ever consider how much heat your engine produces? More on that later but heck, blenders are even a possibility. Who doesn’t want a fresh strawberry smoothie to start your day?

Health food for professional drivers.

Non GMO is always a plus! Professional drivers need a healthy, very well balanced and nutritious diet when on the road. Productivity, awareness, decision making and energy all play a role.

 

Smart storage of your smart food.

Where do you store your food? That all depends on your rig space, but there’s room – trust me. That’s the beauty of storage containers. They take up little to no space and are as convenient as they come. On the floor, in your seat, or in trunk or sleeper bunk there are always spots to secure your food. Cereal, pasta, breads and canned goods can all be at your disposal with the help of containers.

Now of course perishable foods need to be kept cold, but proper storage of your food and ingredients can be simple and very effective. The freezer Ziploc bags are my very first choice when it comes to ensuring my food is stored safe and well preserved. You can call me cheap but I’ve even washed these out and re-used them before. Costco has great deals on them (as low as .03 per bag). The Betty Crocker storage containers sold at Dollar Tree  are second on my list and are cheap. They’re also great for storing grapes, watermelon, blueberries, pineapple – basically any kind of fruit or vegetable can maintain its flavor and freshness is these modern marvels of creation. With just two items you’re on your seriously on your way to many a side dish or main course. Plus you’ve got storage. Just like Emeril says: Bam!!!! Don’t forget to go easy on the salt and try your best to make sure those veggies non-GMO. Many genetically modified foods are missing important components of complex vitamins, can cause allergies and all kinds of disorders – possibly even cancer!!! Also, to keep your mind and body in tip-top shape, stay away from gluten. It’s best avoided and can turn your stomach and insides into a carnival ride you don’t want to be on! The bumpy road has enough potholes and danger areas. Don’t make your gut an up-and-down roller coaster

Aluminum foil is another weapon that can turn a boring Monday into creations that would even have 5-star chefs doing a double take. Seriously. The uses are endless with this master invention. Don’t have a portable burner or stove? No problem. Throw some potatoes, carrots and onions, to go along with seasonings and your choice of lean beef, pork or chicken, wrap it in foil and place it on your manifold. Look who’s got engine stew in no time!!!

While mentioning “master inventions” I found this photo on the web. Now these folks have the right idea:

flatbed trailer next to mobile home

These folks aren’t going to let anything get in their way when it comes to a nice home cooked meal and enjoying it. Even with snow on the ground!

Planning is preparing. Preparing is planning. Make your meals in advance if you have the time. This saves you money and time. I’m not proposing you don’t go and check out that roadside diner once in awhile but the less you do the more your body will be thankful and your wallet will like your decision to keep the pedal to the metal. The $8.99 tenderloin with a side of greasy fries can find another home in someone else’s stomach. You’ll feel better and even look better by eating right. It’s like anything else; you get out what you put in.

Healthy gluten free pasta with fruit and veggies.

Gluten free pasta is pretty darn delicious and very easy on your digestive system. Give your body the food items it deserves. You might just find it’s even cheaper to eat healthy in the long run.

Last but not least. We gotta keep everything clean. The last thing you need is to be barreling down the road
So keep your gas tank full, your eyes on the road and keep pounding that pavement. You’re a driving machine and you know how to recharge your batteries and the proper fuel you need to keep your engine running as smoothly as possible. Just remember – everything in moderation.

Stay tuned for tons of recipes I have waiting on the back burner that are gonna blow your socks off that won’t blow your budget. They’re easy as pie to make and you’ll be a Master Chef in no time. Now Mel over at the diner might miss some business from you, but old Flo can kiss somebody else’s grits!!!

Happy Trucking. Have something you’d like to add or ask? Feel free to jump in online and comment at the bottom of any of my posts and have your voice heard. NO taxes, NO surcharges and NO fees! If I can’t get you up and running properly I’m certain our readers can.

Keep’n it real and keep’n’ it high and wide!

Mr. Miles for
WideloadShipping.com

Equipment drivers future outlook

WideloadShipping.com logo

Another season begins slowly with volumes down but this latest economic boost (growth of 1.2% in the first quarter!)

tells us the future looks bright for the shipping industry. Signs of increasing consumer confidence are evident as we are starting to see sales of boats, swimming pools, machinery and auction equipment.

If you’re not already using the Wideload Shipping phone app you will want to. It works on both iPhone and Android phones and is available in the itunes and Google play store; simply search “Wideload Shipping” and click install.

If you wish to search by state, try searching with the state/province name abbreviation or fully spelled out in your search. This will show all loads/customers shipping to/from this state/province. Be sure to leave us feedback!

Remember PiloTrac.com (http://pilotrac.com) is just a click away anywhere on the site and in the phone app.

Clicking on any of the links to pilot cars will take you to a live map with live pins in it. Simply click the pin for contact information.

Driver nutrition. This is a serious topic. Drivers need balanced nutrition and healthy choices to stay “heart smart” and alert on the road. Truck stops and Road-side diners think more about their profit margins than being consumer conscientious.
We’ll be reporting much more on this topic throughout the summer to help drivers live longer, healthier lives… stay tuned!

Quick reminders:
* Check rig brakes, air and all fluids.
* Inspect all signs, flags and brackets/holders.
* Check all lights, turn signals and strobes.
* Inspect safety equipment flares and extinguishers.
* Check radio equipment, electronics, etc.
* Make sure driver safety vest, jobsite hard hat’s in good shape, fits your driver and is in the cab handy.

If your drivers do not have TWIC cards, get them. There’s no reason you should miss out on work over something so trivial. Need a TWIC card? Need TWIC cards? (https://www.tsa.gov/for-industry/twic) .

We expect a solid season with driver safety at the top of the list and driver nutrition to follow. Please consider these issues as they promote a healthy, sustainable and profitable company.

Let’s have a great season!

 

WideloadShipping.com

FMCSA Hours of Service – HOS.

As you know as of August 28, 2019 the new HOS rules are not approved yet.

2018 FMCSA hours of service HOS rules and regulations.

Hours of Service

As per the FMSCA website.

Who Must Comply?

Most drivers must follow the HOS Regulations if they drive a commercial motor vehicle, or CMV.

In general, a CMV is a vehicle that is used as part of a business and is involved in interstate commerce and fits any of these descriptions:

  • Weighs 10,001 pounds or more
  • Has a gross vehicle weight rating or gross combination weight rating of 10,001 pounds or more
  • Is designed or used to transport 16 or more passengers (including the driver) not for compensation
  • Is designed or used to transport 9 or more passengers (including the driver) for compensation
  • Is transporting hazardous materials in a quantity requiring placards

Hours of Service Final Rule for Truck Drivers

The Hours of Service of Drivers Final Rule was published in the Federal Register on December 27, 2011. The effective date of the Final Rule was February 27, 2012, and the compliance date of remaining provisions was July 1, 2013.

NOTICE: The Consolidated and Further Continuing Appropriations Act of 2015 was enacted on December 16, 2014, suspending enforcement of requirements for use of the 34-hour restart, pending a study. Based on the findings from the CMV Driver Restart Studythe 34-hour restart rule in operational effect on June 30, 2013, is restored to full force and effect.  The requirement for two off-duty periods of 1:00 a.m. to 5:00 a.m. in section 395.3(c) of the Agency’s hours-of-service rules will not be enforced, nor will the once-per-week limit on use of the restart in 395.3(d).

Summary of the Hours of Service Regulations

Hours of Service: How Familiar Are You? Webinar

The FMCSA hours of service (HOS) rules are designed to eliminate the type of drowsiness that can lead to crashes.  Although many commercial motor vehicle (CMV) drivers feel that they know when they are getting drowsy, various laboratory tests have shown that persons are not good at estimating their own drowsiness.

The following topics are discussed in the “Hours of Service: How Familiar Are You?” webinar[external link]:

  • Purpose of the Hours of Service Rules and Regulations
  • Applicability
  • Drivers’ Responsibilities
  • Carriers’ Responsibilities
  • Property Carrier Hours of Service Driving Time Limits
  • Passenger Carrier Hours of Service Driving Time Limits
  • Acceptable Recording Methods
  • Important dates and deadlins for Electronic Loggind Devices (ELDs)
  • Limited Exceptions to the Hours of Service Rules and Regulations

“Hours of service: How Ready are You?” transcripts[external link]

Color/508 Compliant[external link]

Black and White[external link]

Hours of Service Live Question and Answer Session

The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration’s (FMCSA) hour-long Hours of Service (HOS) Question and Answer Session[external link] allowed participants the opportunity to submit HOS related questions and have them answered by FMCSA’s HOS subject matter experts Tom Yager, Chief of the Driver and Carrier Operations Division, and Peter Chandler, Lead Transportation Specialist in the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration Passenger Carrier Division.

The HOS Question and Answer session addressed the number hours that a commercial motor vehicle (CMV) driver may be on the road, the HOS exemptions, and the number of hours a CMV driver may be on duty before a required period of rest.  In addition, the session addressed the permitted driving time based on a driver’s on-duty hours in a “work-week”.

Previous rule under the Obama administration:

 



 

May not drive after 60/70 hours on duty in 7/8 consecutive days. A driver may restart a 7/8 consecutive day period after taking 34 or more consecutive hours off duty as per 2013 FMCSA hours of service HOS rules.

Commercial Motor Vehicle (CMV) drivers using a sleeper berth must take 10 hours off duty, but may split sleeper-berth time into two periods provided neither is less than 2 hours.

CMV drivers using the sleeper berth provision must take at least 8 consecutive hours in the sleeper berth, plus 2 consecutive hours either in the sleeper berth, off duty, or any combination of the two.

Passenger-carrying carriers/drivers are not subject to the new hours-of-service rules. These operations must continue to comply with the FMCSA hours of service HOS rules limitations specified in 49 CFR 395.

SIMPLY stated the new rule means:

Drivers may drive up to 11 hours in the 14-hour on-duty window after they come on duty following 10 or more consecutive hours off duty.
The 14-hour on-duty window may not be extended with off-duty time for meal and fuel stops, etc.
The prohibition on driving after being on duty 60 hours in 7 consecutive days, or 70 hours in 8 consecutive days, remains the same, but drivers can “restart” the 7/8 day period anytime a driver has 34 consecutive hours off duty.
CMV drivers using the sleeper berth provision must take at least 8 consecutive hours in the sleeper berth, plus 2 consecutive hours either in the sleeper berth, off duty, or any combination of the two.

Short-Haul Provision:

Drivers of property-carrying CMVs which do not require a Commercial Driver’s License for operation and who operate within a 150 air-mile radius of their normal work reporting location:

May drive a maximum of 11 hours after coming on duty following 10 or more consecutive hours off duty.
Are not required to keep records-of-duty status (RODS).
May not drive after the 14th hour after coming on duty 5 days a week or after the 16th hour after coming on duty 2 days a week.

Employer must:

Maintain and retain accurate time records for a period of 6 months showing the time the duty period began, ended, and total hours on duty each day in place of RODS.
Drivers who use the above-described Short-haul provision are not eligible to use 100 Air-mile provision 395.1(e) or the current 16-hour exception in 395.1 (o).

In developing these hours-of-service regulations, the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) systematically and extensively researched both United States and international health and fatigue studies and consulted with Federal safety and health experts. Our roads are better designed, constructed, and maintained in a nationwide network to provide greater mobility, accessibility, and safety for all highway users. Vehicles have been dramatically improved in terms of design, construction, safety, comfort, efficiency, emissions, technology, and ergonomics. These factors, combined with years of driver fatigue and sleep disorder research, led to a revision of the hours-of-service regulations for drivers.

FMCSA will continue working with its partners and stakeholders to assure a smooth transition to the new regulations. Please join us in working together to implement these new regulations for the continuing improvement of motor carrier safety. For more information or additional outreach materials, visit the FMCSA’s Web site at www.fmcsa.dot.gov.

FMCSA hours of service HOS.